Alice in Storageland, or, a guest blog at MapR’s site

‘I could tell you my adventures—beginning from this morning,’ said Alice a little timidly: ‘but it’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then.’

–Lewis Carroll, “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

mapr-blog-snippetI was invited to guest-blog on MapR’s site recently, in preparation for a webcast I’m doing next week with their VP of Partner Strategy, Bill Peterson. MapR is known for a highly technical blog, but I’ve learned and shown that even technical things can be a bit entertaining now and then.

So, after a turn of phrase that brought Lewis Carroll to mind, you can go see a couple of Alice references and, in a strange sort of way, how they fit my evolution into storage administration–not entirely unlike my evolution into business intelligence and big data and most of the other stuff I’ve ever made my living at.

Visit the posting, “It’s no use going back to yesterday’s storage platform for tomorrow’s applications,”  on MapR’s blog site, and if you’d like come through the looking-glass with Bill and I on Wednesday, January 25, 2017, register with the links on that page.

As an aside, I promise that Bill is not the one mentioned in “The Rabbit Sends a Little Bill.”

 

Photo credit: Public domain image from 1890, per Wikimedia Commons

Disclosure: I work for Cisco; these blogs (rsts11 and rsts11travel) are independent and generally unrelated to my day job. However, in this case, the linked blog post as well as the referenced webinar are part of my day job. The humor is my own, for which I am solely responsible, and not at all sorry. 

Links updated March 20, 2017, due to MapR blog site maintenance.

Advertisements

Belated Post-Strata Thoughts 2: Logs and Logistics in Ops Analytics 

This is the second in a short series around Strata San Jose 2016. If you haven’t read part one, you can check out Hadoop Is Finally Over here.

In our last episode, we talked about new tween Hadoop, which celebrates its 10th birthday this year. We also looked at the death of Hadoop, MapReduce, and visualization. If you haven’t read part one, go check it out!

Not to get too George RR Martin on you, but there’s another death coming. It’s not who you think.

SPLUNK IS OVER…

[Disclosure: I work with Splunk in my day job, and have been a fan since the first t-shirt came out. These thoughts do not purport to represent Splunk or my day job.]

[Further disclosure: I’ll mention another company in this section, and I was a customer of the cofounder’s previous employer for many years. I worked with him in that role, and I think he’s cool. He did not pay me to say that. Yet.]

Splunk is also a tween now. They’ve been selling software for just over ten years, and I’d guess a fair number of their 11,000+ customers don’t even think of them as big data. But they are.

2016-04-13 19.30.07

This is NOT Buttercup. This is merely a lady horse working at a venue in Nashville, Tennessee

Continue reading

Belated Post-Strata Thoughts 1: Hadoop is finally over…

[Apology: Formatting issues may have been resolved.]

Last month I managed to attend a big data event as an attendee, for the first time in nearly two years. One upside to being a big data storyteller is that you don’t get 3am oncall pages. Downsides at events like Strata include that you’re often working the booth, or preparing for and recovering from a presentation, or trying to convince vendors that your role doesn’t involve buying software and services for a Fortune 50 company personally.

Sure, I did give a brief booth presentation for my friends at MapR on both expo days at Strata SJ, but more time was spent catching up with the people in my ecosystem who I rarely see, learning what they’re doing new these days (or who they’re working for these days), and occasionally getting a no-BS perspective on a very rife-for-BS idea, product, or company.

One of the other upsides to not being a buyer anymore is that it is easy, and practical, to jettison the sales pitches and move on to the stories. I tell stories. I don’t deploy production environments anymore. And it’s refreshing to be able to look at things outside the sales pressure.

HADOOP IS OVER…

So the first point, which was teased at Strata NYC last fall, is that Hadoop is finally over…

Continue reading

What a long, strange year it’s been… Year one at Cisco

I’m writing this post on June 23, 2015, from a hotel in Boston. On June 23, 2014, I walked into building 9 on the Cisco campus in San Jose, taking my first job in almost 20 years with no hands-on sysadmin responsibilities. I’ll admit, it was terrifying in a way.

Tell me more, tell me more…

I had just come home a month earlier from Cisco Live 2014 in San Francisco. When I got on the train to go home that Thursday afternoon in May, I couldn’t have told you that it would be my last sponsored visit with Tech Field Day, or my last trade show as a regular customer. But when I woke up the next morning to a voicemail from my soon-to-be manager at Cisco, I made the decision promptly and prepared to hang up my oncall pager.

In the year between last June 23 and this June 23, I seem to have built a personal brand as a big data safari tour guide, complete with the safari hat you see in my profiles around the Internet. I’ve presented to internal sales engineering teams, my VP’s leadership team, partners and customers, vendor theatre audiences at Strata+Hadoop World and Cisco Live, as well as keynoting three Big Data Everywhere events. And in the highest honor so far, I was chosen to give a breakout session at Cisco Live earlier this month in San Diego.

I’ve brought context, proportion, and no small amount of humor to the topic of big data at Cisco, as well as sharing my experience with systems management and real-world Cisco UCS deployment, and while I’ve still got work to do, it’s gone fairly well so far. I’ve had customers say “oh, I’ve read your blog, we’d like to talk to you” and “if you’ve got the hat with you, could you put it on?” I’ve been told that VPs are noticing what I do in a positive sense. And once again I’m pretty well known for my coffee addiction as well.

There have been a couple of downsides… seeing as I’ve gone over the dark side (and still can’t find the cookies), I can’t be a Tech Field Day delegate anymore. I also lost Cisco Champion (although I’m still a Champion Emeritus and a supporter of the program whenever I can be) and PernixPro (for reasons I’m not 100% sure of) status. And of course, the free Disney parks admissions went away very quickly. But the benefits of the change definitely outweigh the downsides; I still get invited to the TFD parties, and I can buy my park hopper passes when I need them.

So where do we go from here?

When this trip is done, I’ll be home for about two months, and will be focusing on some of the more hands-on technical stuff I’ve postponed, with the help of a couple of spare electrical circuits for my home lab. I have a couple of speaking engagements likely on the horizon, and probably some booth babe duty as well.

I’ll also be catching up on my Interop coverage from last month… I feel bad about neglecting a couple of those interviews but a couple of work obligations came up and ate most of May. I still have that citizen-analyst role to play from time to time, even though I don’t have mouse ears to take off to play that role anymore.

But for now, I want to thank everyone who’s made this year of incredible growth possible, from the bosses who (perhaps unintentionally) convinced me to prove that my message had an audience, to friends at Cisco who convinced me that there might be a place for me here, to the leaders and colleagues and partners who continue to remind me regularly that what I have to say matters and helps people both inside and outside Cisco.

I’ll leave you with what was an unexpected cap on the end of year one… I gave my “What could possibly go wrong? Tales from the Trenches of Big Data” talk a third time at Big Data Everywhere in Boston this morning. A reporter from CRN, the channel marketing website, was in the front row taping and taking notes… and my “plan for failure” message resonated enough to get mentioned on CRN today.

I may not be a vice president, but I’m still doing work I love, with people I admire and respect (and who often reciprocate), and who knows, I may end up in your neighborhood soon using 20th century pop lyrics and terrible puns to make sense of big data. See you real soon….

The cloudy nature of cloud and big data – with Gan Sharma at Asigra Summit

Last month, during a week off between jobs, I did what anyone would do on their vacation… I went to Canada for a software vendor’s partner summit.

What, you don’t do that sort of thing on your time off?

Well, the fine folks at Asigra invited me to attend their partner summit (disclosure: travel and accomodations were provided by Asigra) and, having been impressed with their technology and their history in the past, I accepted the invitation and made my first visit to Canada in about ten years.

First, the videos.

Gan Sharma, Asigra’s Director of Business Development, sat down with me before the event to talk about a couple of technological topics of broad interest, that both he and I are “a little bit obsessed with” (in my words). We had our friends at Prime Image Media, also known as the team behind Tech Field Day’s videos, there to record our conversations. I’m pleased to be able to share them with you here.

First, we talked about balancing the budget impact of backup and recovery with the risk factors of not having a backup and recovery strategy.

To be honest, backup and recovery can be a serious investment (some might call it a money pit, especially if it’s not planned and executed properly). But having to recover your data from pre-data-pipeline sources, or not being able to recover it, can be a far more financially draining experience.

Second, we talked about two very cloudy topics–“The Cloud” and “Big Data.”

One of the biggest sources of confusion, fear, uncertainty, and doubt around both The Cloud and Big Data is the lack of a clear and unassailable definition for either. As I mentioned, nobody has come up with one answer to what The Cloud is, or what Big Data is… because there isn’t exactly one complete and true answer.

But wait, there’s more… soon…

Stay tuned for another post or two around the Asigra Partner Summit. I need to write enough about the Partner Summit at least long enough to be able to not spell it “parnter” the first time I type it.

 

Disclosure:

I attended the 2014 Asigra Partner Summit at Asigra’s invitation, as an independent blogger, and the company paid for my travel and lodging to attend. I have not received any compensation for participating, nor have Asigra requested or required any particular coverage or content. Anything related on rsts11.com or in my twitter feed are my own thoughts and of my own motivation.